2017 Virginia Soybean Yield Contest

The Virginia Soybean Association in cooperation with Virginia Cooperative Extension would like to announce the 2017 Virginia Soybean Yield Contest. The purpose of the Virginia Soybean Yield Contest is to emphasize and demonstrate the practices necessary to produce maximum economic yields, to recognize those producers who grow high-yielding soybeans, and to gather data on the practices utilized by these outstanding producers. With the help of various seed companies, we reward and promote the achievements of Virginia’s most productive soybean farmers.

There are four Soybean Yield Contest categories: 1) Full-Season, Non-irrigated; 2) Double-Crop, Non-irrigated; and 3) Irrigated (encompasses Full-Season and Double-Crop); and 4) Most Efficient Yield (MEY). First, second, and third place winners of the full-season, double-crop, and irrigated contest will be recognized with appropriate trophies or plaques. In addition, cash awards of $200, $100, and $50 will be presented to the first, second, and third place winners in each of these categories. The winner of the MEY contest will receive a plaque declaring him or her the most efficient soybean producer in Virginia for that year.

In addition, the United Soybean Board is supporting a Soybean Quality Contest for the 2017 season.  The Iowa State University Grain Quality Lab with evaluate these samples for protein, oil, and other quality measures.  You can obtain a sample bag from me.  If you do not have one at the time of harvest, just save a seed sample in a 1 gallon bag and send in to my office.

Printable entry forms and contest details can be obtained from your County Agent or on my website:  (https://www.arec.vaes.vt.edu/arec/tidewater/extension/soybean.html).  I look forward to seeing your entries.

Peanut Maturity in Virginia

According to the weather recordings (http://webipm.ento.vt.edu/cgi-bin/infonet1.cgi), the heat units received by peanuts grown in Virginia from May 1 through September 5 are in average 2370 °F.  There are, of course, location variations. For example, in Suffolk total heat units from May 1 is 2566 °F, in Southampton 2314 °F, Greensville 2480 °F, and Waverly 2123 °F.  The current Virginia type commercial cultivars predominantly grown in Virginia require in average 2650 °F to optimum maturity. With a daily average of 70 °F recorded in the past week, optimum maturity seems to happen in the next day and a half to 7.5 days. However, would it?

Probably not, and the pictures below prove it. Today, Sep 6, we determined the maturity of four cultivars, Bailey, Sullivan, Emery and Wynn, planted in Suffolk on May 3.  Based on the mesocarp color, when laid on a color maturity chart, it seems that a minimum of 20 to 24 days are still needed to reach the optimum digging for this location and the current season. In average, cultivars only have 1% of black pods, 14% brown, 20% orange, 44% yellow and 22% white.

Pod blasting demonstrations will take place this week Friday, September 8, at the Southampton Fairgrounds from 8:00 AM to noon. It will be a repeat at Indika Farms in Windsor on September 14; times will have to be determined, but probably also in the morning. See you there with your peanut samples to be pod blasted!

Current maturity of Bailey peanut planted on May 3 In Suffolk, VA.

Current maturity of Sullivan peanut planted on May 3 in Suffolk, VA.

Current maturity of Emery peanut planted on May 3 in Suffolk, VA.

Current maturity of Wynne peanut planted on May 3 in Suffolk, VA.

Eastern Shore AREC Field DAY: September 13th, 2017

Please join us for Virginia Tech’s Eastern Shore Agricultural Research and Extension Center (ESAREC) 2017 Research Field Day on Wednesday, September 13th. Registration is free, open to the public and will begin at 8:00 AM at the ESAREC complex located at 33446 Research Drive, Painter, Virginia 23420. The field tour will begin at 9:00 AM and conclude with lunch at 12:30 PM.  See the attached flyer for specific projects to be highlighted and more information.

If you would like more information or are interested in sponsoring this event, please contact Lauren Seltzer at 757-414-0724 ext. 11 or email at mlpeyton@vt.edu.

2017 ESAREC Field Day Announcement

Sweet corn moth trap monitoring in VA – Week of Aug 27, 2017

Monitoring sweet corn for pest moth activity can help reduce the number of insecticide applications.  At Kentland Farm in Whitethorne, VA, we recently harvested the first of several tests, where we followed an IPM approach and compared it to sprays of the pyrethroid lambda-cyhalothrin 3 times per week during silking.  We saw no difference in the level of control from an IPM approach- only spraying when needed and spraying the diamide Coragen first compared with the frequent lambda pyrethroid sprays.   We will be harvesting multiple sites for this experiment and will share these when all of the data are in.  Several commercial sweet corn farms are still being monitored around Virginia for corn earworm and fall armyworm.  However, many fields have been harvested already and trapping has been discontinued.  Moth Trap Catch Data are being recorded by:  Katlyn Catron  (Montgomery Co.); Jason Cooper (Rockingham Co.); Ursula Deitch (Northampton Co.); Helene Doughty (Accomack Co. & Virginia Beach); Kenner Love (Rappahannock Co.); Laura Maxey Nay (Hanover Co.); Steve Pottorff (Carrol Co.); Stephanie Romelczyk  (Westmoreland Co.); Laura Siegle (Amelia Co.); and Mark Sutphin (Frederick Co.).

This week we observed general drop-off in corn earworm moth catch at many locations, but a big jump in numbers in Rockingham County in the Shenandoah Valley.  Fall armyworm moths never really amounted to anything this year. For corn earworm, moth trap catch of less than 1 per night means  low pest pressure and sweet corn sprays can probably be spaced 5-6 days apart during silking.  However, a catch of >1 or >13 moths per night means moderate and high pest pressure, respectively, and a more frequent spray interval (every 3 or 2 days) is justified.  Here are the trap catch results (moths per night) for several locations around Virginia for this week (note we do not have data for all locations):

Week of Aug 27 (avg)
Region County Field CEW/night FAW/night
Eastern Shore Accomack ESAREC – cemetery 3.1 NA
Eastern Shore Accomack ESAREC – woods NA NA
Eastern Shore Accomack ESAREC – sweet corn 2.5 0
Eastern Shore Northampton Bridge Tunnel NA NA
Eastern Shore Northampton Capeville 1 NA 0
Eastern Shore Northampton Cape charles NA NA
Eastern Shore Northampton Eastville NA 0.2
Eastern Shore Northampton Nassawaddox NA 0.4
Virginia Beach Virginia Beach Pungo 1 NA NA
Piedmont Amelia Field 1 NA NA
Piedmont Hanover Farm 1 NA 0.4
Piedmont Hanover Haynes NA NA
Northern Neck Westmoreland Field 1 1.0 0.0
Northern Neck Westmoreland Field 2 NA NA
Shenandoah Valley Rappahannock Field 1 2.7 0
Shenandoah Valley Page Field 1 NA NA
Shenandoah Valley Frederick Farm 1 10.5 0
Shenandoah Valley Frederick Farm 2 15.5 0
Shenandoah Valley Rockingham Farm 1 18.1 0
Shenandoah Valley Rockingham Farm 2 NA NA
New River Valley Montgomery KC 0 0
New River Valley Montgomery KO1 1 0
New River Valley Montgomery KO2 1 NA
New River Valley Montgomery WF1 0 NA
New River Valley Montgomery WF2 0 NA
New River Valley Montgomery WF3 0 NA
New River Valley Montgomery WS1 1 NA
New River Valley Montgomery WS2 0 NA
New River Valley Montgomery WS3 1 NA
Southwest Carroll NA NA

Insect update for Aug. 31, 2017

This week, corn earworm (bollworm) moth captures in the black light trap were down at most locations (steady at Chesapeake and Prince George-Templeton), perhaps partly due to the rainy weather, but some “down” numbers are still pretty high (Suffolk, for example). The table is here: BLT_31_Aug_2017

We had no reports of any brown marmorated stink bugs captured in the black light traps this week.

We have vial-tested close to 1,000 corn earworm moths in Dr. Taylor’s pyrethroid resistance monitoring program in 2017, with an average of 38% survival.

Sweetcorn insect pest monitoring across VA for week of Aug 20, 2017

Large corn earworm larva in sweet corn soon getting ready to exit the ear to pupate in the ground.

Monitoring sweet corn for pest moth activity can help reduce the number of insecticide applications.  At Kentland Farm in Whitethorne, VA, we recently harvested the first of several tests, where we followed an IPM approach and compared it to sprays of the pyrethroid lambda-cyhalothrin 3 times per week during silking.  We saw no difference in the level of control from an IPM approach- only spraying when needed and spraying the diamide Coragen first compared with the frequent lambda pyrethroid sprays.   We will be harvesting multiple sites for this experiment and will share these when all of the data are in.  Commercial sweet corn farms are being monitored around Virginia for corn earworm and fall armyworm.  Moth Trap Catch Data are being recorded by:  Katlyn Catron  (Montgomery Co.); Jason Cooper (Rockingham Co.); Ursula Deitch (Northampton Co.); Helene Doughty (Accomack Co. & Virginia Beach); Kenner Love (Rappahannock Co.); Laura Maxey Nay (Hanover Co.); Steve Pottorff (Carrol Co.); Stephanie Romelczyk  (Westmoreland Co.); Laura Siegle (Amelia Co.); Rebekah Slabach (Halifax Co.); and Mark Sutphin (Frederick Co.).

This week we continued to observe moderate (above threshold) corn earworm moth catch at many locations, to warrant continued spraying.  Some of the areas with the highest CEW activity continue to be the Eastern Shore, and Frederick Co.; however, CEW moth catch has increased in Westmoreland, Rockinham, and Hanover Co.   We still have seen few to no fall armyworm moths yet. For corn earworm, moth trap catch of less than 1 per night means  low pest pressure and sweet corn sprays can probably be spaced 5-6 days apart during silking.  However, a catch of >1 or >13 moths per night means moderate and high pest pressure, respectively, and a more frequent spray interval (every 3 or 2 days) is justified.  Here are the trap catch results (moths per night) for several locations around Virginia for this week (note we do not have data for all locations):

Week of Aug 20 (avg)
Region County Field CEW/night FAW/night
Eastern Shore Accomack ESAREC – cemetery 1.4 NA
Eastern Shore Accomack ESAREC – woods NA NA
Eastern Shore Accomack ESAREC – sweet corn 1.4 0.2
Eastern Shore Northampton Bridge Tunnel 8.4 NA
Eastern Shore Northampton Capeville 1 1.3 0
Eastern Shore Northampton Cape charles 1.1 NA
Eastern Shore Northampton Eastville 5.3 0.2
Eastern Shore Northampton Nassawaddox 0.6 0.4
Virginia Beach Virginia Beach Pungo 1 NA NA
Piedmont Amelia Field 1 NA NA
Piedmont Hanover Farm 1 3.4 0.4
Piedmont Hanover Haynes NA NA
Northern Neck Westmoreland Field 1 7.0 0.6
Northern Neck Westmoreland Field 2 NA NA
Shenandoah Valley Rappahannock Field 1 3.5 0
Shenandoah Valley Page Field 1 NA NA
Shenandoah Valley Frederick Farm 1 5.6 0
Shenandoah Valley Frederick Farm 2 14.4 0
Shenandoah Valley Rockingham Farm 1 6.4 0
Shenandoah Valley Rockingham Farm 2 NA NA
New River Valley Montgomery KC NA NA
New River Valley Montgomery KO1 NA NA
New River Valley Montgomery KO2 NA NA
New River Valley Montgomery WF1 NA NA
New River Valley Montgomery WF2 NA NA
New River Valley Montgomery WF3 NA NA
New River Valley Montgomery WS1 NA NA
New River Valley Montgomery WS2 NA NA
New River Valley Montgomery WS3 NA NA
Southwest Carroll NA NA

Sweet corn pest monitoring in VA – Moth trap catch for week of Aug 13th

Although corn is not insect pollinated, it doesn’t mean that it doesn’t attract a lot of bees gathering up pollen from the tassels (Fig. 1).  Pyrethroid insecticides are quite toxic to bees, so spraying them during pollen shed will undoubtedly result in some bee kills.  What can you do if you need to protect your corn from “worm” pests?  Spraying an insecticide with low toxicity to bees (i.e., Coragen) during pollen shed can help.  Also monitoring for pest activity and possibly limiting the number of sprays can also help.

Honey bees gathering pollen from sweet corn at Kentland Farm in Whitethorne, VA.

Sweet corn farms are being monitored around Virginia for corn earworm and fall armyworm.  Moth Trap Catch Data are being recorded by:  Katlyn Catron  (Montgomery Co.); Jason Cooper (Rockingham Co.); Ursula Deitch (Northampton Co.); Helene Doughty (Accomack Co. & Virginia Beach); Kenner Love (Rappahannock Co.); Laura Maxey Nay (Hanover Co.); Steve Pottorff (Carrol Co.); Stephanie Romelczyk  (Westmoreland Co.); Laura Siegle (Amelia Co.); Rebekah Slabach (Halifax Co.); and Mark Sutphin (Frederick Co.).

Male corn earworm moth on Heliothis Trap.

This week we continued to observe high corn earworm moth catch at many locations, to warrant frequent spraying.  Some of the areas with the highest CEW activity were on the Eastern Shore, Virginia Beach, Frederick Co., Montgomery Co. and Hanover Co.   We still have not seen very many  fall armyworm moths yet. For corn earworm, moth trap catch of less than 1 per night means  low pest pressure and sweet corn sprays can probably be spaced 5-6 days apart during silking.  However, a catch of >1 or >13 moths per night means moderate and high pest pressure, respectively, and a more frequent spray interval (every 3 or 2 days) is justified.  Here are the trap catch results (moths per night) for several locations around Virginia for this week (note we do not have data for all locations):

Week of Aug 13 (avg)
Region County Field CEW/night FAW/night
Eastern Shore Accomack ESAREC – cemetery 7.0 NA
Eastern Shore Accomack ESAREC – woods 0.2 NA
Eastern Shore Accomack ESAREC – sweet corn 19.7 0.2
Eastern Shore Northampton Bridge Tunnel 12.1 NA
Eastern Shore Northampton Capeville 1 0.8 0.5
Eastern Shore Northampton Cape charles 1.2 NA
Eastern Shore Northampton Eastville 3.1 0.8
Eastern Shore Northampton Nassawaddox 0.1 2
Virginia Beach Virginia Beach Pungo 1 16.1 0.7
Piedmont Amelia Field 1 NA NA
Piedmont Hanover Farm 1 3.5 0.5
Piedmont Hanover Haynes NA NA
Northern Neck Westmoreland Field 1 0.6 0.0
Northern Neck Westmoreland Field 2 NA NA
Shenandoah Valley Rappahannock Field 1 2.8 0.2
Shenandoah Valley Page Field 1 0.1 0
Shenandoah Valley Frederick Farm 1 5.6 0
Shenandoah Valley Frederick Farm 2 14.4 0
Shenandoah Valley Rockingham Farm 1 NA NA
Shenandoah Valley Rockingham Farm 2 NA NA
New River Valley Montgomery KC 0.9 0
New River Valley Montgomery KO1 4.9 0
New River Valley Montgomery KO2 9.4 0
New River Valley Montgomery WF1 1.1 NA
New River Valley Montgomery WF2 0.6 NA
New River Valley Montgomery WF3 0.7 NA
New River Valley Montgomery WS1 2.4 NA
New River Valley Montgomery WS2 0.9 NA
New River Valley Montgomery WS3 2.6 NA
Southwest Carroll NA NA

Insect update for Aug. 17, 2017

Corn earworm moth captures in the black light traps ranged from 2 to 45 moths per night; brown marmorated stink bug catches ranged from zero to 2.6 per night. Here are the data tables: BLT_17_Aug_2017

In our corn earworm (bollworm) vial tests, we are averaging 39% moth survival, with 832 moths tested to date.

Sweet corn sampling across Virginia – Moth Catch for Week of Aug 6-10

 

 

 

 

Corn earworm larva developing fine on Bt sweet corn in Page County, VA.  Photo by Kenner Love, VCE.

Sweet corn farms are being monitored around Virginia for corn earworm and fall armyworm.  Moth Trap Catch Data are being recorded by:  Katlyn Catron  (Montgomery Co.); Jason Cooper (Rockingham Co.); Ursula Deitch (Northampton Co.); Helene Doughty (Accomack Co. & Virginia Beach); Kenner Love (Rappahannock Co.); Laura Maxey Nay (Hanover Co.); Steve Pottorff (Carrol Co.); Stephanie Romelczyk  (Westmoreland Co.); Laura Siegle (Amelia Co.); Rebekah Slabach (Halifax Co.); and Mark Sutphin (Frederick Co.).

Male corn earworm moth on Heliothis Trap.

This week we observed a general increase in corn earworm moth catch at many locations, to warrant frequent spraying.  Some of the areas with the highest CEW activity were on the Eastern Shore, Virginia Beach, Frederick Co., Montgomery Co. and Hanover Co.   We still have not seen very many  fall armyworm moths yet. For corn earworm, moth trap catch of less than 1 per night means  low pest pressure and sweet corn sprays can probably be spaced 5-6 days apart during silking.  However, a catch of >1 or >13 moths per night means moderate and high pest pressure, respectively, and a more frequent spray interval (every 3 or 2 days) is justified.  Here are the trap catch results (moths per night) for several locations around Virginia for this week (note we do not have data for all locations):

Week of Aug 6 (avg)
Region County Field CEW/night FAW/night
Eastern Shore Accomack ESAREC – cemetery 6.0 NA
Eastern Shore Accomack ESAREC – woods 0.2 NA
Eastern Shore Accomack ESAREC – sweet corn 18.6 0.9
Eastern Shore Northampton Bridge Tunnel 18.3 NA
Eastern Shore Northampton Capeville 1 1.0 0
Eastern Shore Northampton Cape charles 3.0 NA
Eastern Shore Northampton Eastville 2.7 1.8
Eastern Shore Northampton Nassawaddox 0.3 0.3
Virginia Beach Virginia Beach Pungo 1 6.2 0.9
Piedmont Amelia Field 1 NA NA
Piedmont Hanover Farm 1 6.3 0.0
Piedmont Hanover Haynes NA NA
Northern Neck Westmoreland Field 1 NA NA
Northern Neck Westmoreland Field 2 NA NA
Shenandoah Valley Rappahannock Field 1 0.6 0.1
Shenandoah Valley Page Field 1 0.2 0.1
Shenandoah Valley Frederick Farm 1 6.1 0
Shenandoah Valley Frederick Farm 2 28.3 NA
Shenandoah Valley Rockingham Farm 1 3.4 NA
Shenandoah Valley Rockingham Farm 2 NA NA
New River Valley Montgomery KC 1.3 0
New River Valley Montgomery KO1 18.0 0
New River Valley Montgomery KO2 28.3 0
New River Valley Montgomery WF1 6.8 NA
New River Valley Montgomery WF2 1.3 NA
New River Valley Montgomery WF3 6.7 NA
New River Valley Montgomery WS1 8.8 NA
New River Valley Montgomery WS2 0.0 NA
New River Valley Montgomery WS3 4.5 NA
Southwest Carroll 0.3 0.5