Author Archives: Chris Bergh

Continued codling moth captures at Winchester AREC

Greetings,

I wanted to let you know that, as of today, our weekly captures of codling moth here at the Winchester AREC increased over the last week and were the highest they’ve been since late July. We’re not certain that the DD model is reflecting the activity of third brood codling moth particularly well this year, so I would urge you to pay attention to your codling moth pressure, especially if average weekly captures exceed the threshold of 5 moths/trap, which would warrant control. Also a reminder that the flight of fourth generation oriental fruit moth adults, which peaks in mid-September or so, is typically quite large. Captures of this pest that exceed the threshold of 10 moths/trap/week would trigger management. Altacor (4-hour REI, 5- day PHI), Delegate (4-hour REI, 7-day PHI), and Exirel (12-hour REI, 3-day PHI) are excellent options for both pests. CheckMate OFM-F sprayable pheromone (0-hour REI, 0-day PHI) is also a strong option for oriental fruit moth, and should provide protection through the remainder of the season. The product, Besiege (formerly Voliam Xpress), is a premixture of Altacor and the pyrethroid, lambda-cyhalothrin, and would have strong activity against the moth pests and brown marmorated stink bug (REI 24 hours, PHI 21 days).

Until next time, best wishes.

Uptick in brown marmorated stink bug numbers

Greetings,

As is always the case at this time of the year, captures of brown marmorated stink bug (BMSB) nymphs and adults in pheromone traps are beginning to increase and expected to continue to increase over the next several weeks. Peak captures tend to occur during the first half of September, but captures typically continue into October. Many of the nymphs being captured are in the later instars, which like adults, can cause economic injury at harvest. I have had one report from Virginia of increasing BMSB injury to Pink Lady apples over the last week or so. While BMSB captures have been relatively low until now, many varieties harvested in September and later are vulnerable to the highest BMSB populations of the season. It would be prudent to scout orchards for injury at this time, looking for any indications of external (small discolored holes, spots or depressions) or internal injury (discolored flesh).  BMSB injury to apples tends to be highest in the mid- and upper canopy of trees in border rows that are adjacent to woodland, so evaluating apples from those locations should provide a good indication of current status. Insecticide options for BMSB with a 7-day PHI include Baythroid XL, Belay, Leverage 360, or Tombstone. Venom and Scorpion have a 3-day PHI under the Section 18 Emergency Exemption and Bifenture or Brigade (14-day PHI) can also be used under a Section 18, but with a 30-day minimum re-treatment interval.  Danitol  and Lannate also have a 14-day PHI in apples, and Warrior or Lambda-Cy have a 21-day PHI. Note that use of Lannate or the pyrethroids in this group at this time may incite higher fall populations of woolly apple aphid.

Until next time, best wishes.

Section 18 Emergency Exemption for dinotefuran approved

On May 22, 2017 the EPA approved a Section 18 Emergency Exemption for use of the insecticide, dinotefuran, against brown marmorated stink bug in pome and stone fruit crops in Virginia. The two products included in this exemption are Venom Insecticide and Scorpion 35SL Insecticide. Per application, Venom can be used at rates between 4.0 and 6.75 oz of product per acre (0.179 to 0.302 lb active ingredient) and Scorpion at 8.0 to 12.0 fl oz of product per acre (0.203 to 0.304 lb active ingredient). Restrictions include a maximum of two applications per season, a seasonal maximum of 0.608 lb active ingredient per acre (regardless of product used), and a minimum 7-day re-application interval. The re-entry interval for both products is 12-hours and a 3-day pre-harvest interval must be observed for both. This compound is highly toxic to bees. This Section 18 for use of dinotefuran  in Virginia pome and stone fruit expires on October 15, 2017.

Section 18 for Bifenture 10DF, Bifenture EC, and Brigade WSB in Virginia

Greetings,

On April 21, 2017 the Environmental Protection Agency approved a petition to renew a Section 18 Emergency Exemption for use of the bifenthrin-based products, Brigade WSB, Bifenture EC, and Bifenture 10DF against brown marmorated stink bug in apples, peaches, and nectarines in Virginia. This exemption applies only to the products mentioned above. These and other bifenthrin-based insecticides have a full Section 3 label for use in pears in Virginia. The requirements of this Section 18 are that applications must be made only during the post-bloom period and by ground only, at a rate of 0.08 to 0.2 lb active ingredient (a.i.) per acre, with not more than 0.5 lb a.i. per acre per season. These application rates equate to 5.12 – 12.8 fl oz of Bifenture EC, 12.8 – 32.0 oz of Bifenture 10DF, and 12.8 – 32.0 oz of Brigade WSB per acre, and seasonal maximums of 32 fl oz of Bifenture EC, 80 oz of Bifenture 10DF, or 72 oz of Brigade WSB. Multiple applications may be made per season, at a minimum re-treatment interval of 30 days. The REI is 12 hours and the PHI is 14 days. This insecticide is extremely toxic to fish, aquatic invertebrates and bees, and all precautions to avoid these exposures must be observed. Specifically, to help minimize exposure to pollinators, the following statement about the application timing must be observed, “Do not apply this product until after petal fall”. Since bifenthrin is considered one of the strongest insecticides against brown marmorated stink bug but can be disruptive to natural enemies of secondary pests, we recommend its use later in the season for apples, when stink bug populations are highest. In peaches and nectarines, its benefits might be best as fruit approach maturity, but outside of the 14-day PHI. This Emergency Exemption expires on October 15, 2017.

Until next time, best wishes.

OFM biofix

Greetings,

OFM biofix for Winchester and Rappahannock/Madison county was on April 3. The captures in central Virginia orchards where traps were deployed for this purpose have been too low to see a consistent pattern, although we will likely use the same date for that area.  Rainy/windy conditions in southwest Virginia seem to have affected captures through last week, but we will make a determination of biofix for that area soon. We will begin our twice weekly reporting  of degree-day accumulations and management recommendations for OFM this week, via this blog.

Until next time, best wishes.

EPA retains all chlorpyrifos tolerances

Greetings,

On March 29, 2017 the Environmental Protection Agency announced its decision to retain all tolerances for chlorpyrifos. A communication from the registrant, Dow AgroSciences, noted that EPA “…will focus its attention on updating and revising its human health assessment for chlorpyrifos under the standard procedures of the Registration Review process scheduled for completion on October 1, 2022.”

Until next time, best wishes.

Insecticide information update

Greetings,

An insecticide from Syngenta, called Minecto Pro, is now labeled for use in pome and stone fruit in Virginia. This pre-mixture product contains cyantraniliprole, which has strong activity against moth larvae and a range of other pests, and the miticide, abamectin.  Cyantraniliprole and abamectin are the active ingredients in Exirel and Agri-Mek, respectively.  The product is toxic to bees, therefore cannot be used until petal-fall or later and has additional label language related to this issue. In pome and stone fruit, its rate range is 8-12 fl oz/acre, depending on the pest(s) targeted. It is labeled for use against moth larvae, spider and rust mites, pear psylla, rosy apple aphid, black cherry aphid, European apple sawfly, spotted wing drosophila, and a number of others. Because it contains abamectin for mites, it is an early-season product that must be applied with an adjuvant for UV-protection and before the foliage hardens. No more than 2 sequential applications are allowed per season, with a minimum 21-day reapplication interval and a seasonal maximum of 24 fl oz/acre. It has a 12-hour REI and a preharvest interval of 28 days in pome fruit and 21 days in stone fruit. See the label at the following link, which also contains information about tank-mixing with some fungicides and other important information. http://www.cdms.net/ldat/ldDIT000.pdf

Another pre-mixed product from Syngenta, Voliam Xpress, has been given a new trade name, Besiege. It has the same concentration of the active ingredients, chlorantraniliprole or Altacor, and lambda-cyhalothrin, or Warrior and will be sold at a reduced price compared with its previous version.

Finally, we anticipate word from EPA soon about its decision regarding the fate of chlorpyrifos (Lorsban and others). Renewal applications for the Section 18 Emergency Exemptions for bifenthrin and dinotefuran against brown marmorated stink bug in pome and stone fruit have been submitted to the EPA and I will keep you posted about those.

Until next time, best wishes.

EPA decision regarding Belt insecticide

Greetings,

Bayer CropScience announced today that EPA will proceed with its decision to cancel the registration of the insecticide, Belt, which has been used to manage moth larvae in tree fruit systems such as codling moth, oriental fruit moth, and leafrollers. The decision does allow for existing stocks to be sold and used by growers, although there is no timeline or deadline provided for these activities. Any further information regarding this decision will be posted as it is available.