Category Archives: Uncategorized

Section 18 Emergency Exemption for Bifenture EC, Bifenture 10DF and Brigade WSB in Virginia

On May 31, 2016, the Environmental Protection Agency approved a Section 18 Emergency Exemption for use of the bifenthrin-based products, Brigade WSB, Bifenture EC, and Bifenture 10DF against brown marmorated stink bug in apples, peaches, and nectarines in Virginia. This exemption applies only to the products mentioned above. These and other bifenthrin-based insecticides have a full Section 3 label for use in pears in Virginia. The requirements of this Section 18 are that applications must be made only during the post-bloom period and by ground only, at a rate of 0.08 to 0.2 lb active ingredient (a.i.) per acre, with not more than 0.5 lb a.i. per acre per season. These application rates equate to 5.12 – 12.8 fl oz of Bifenture EC, 12.8 – 32.0 oz of Bifenture 10DF, and 12.8 – 32.0 oz of Brigade WSB per acre, and seasonal maximums of 32 fl oz of Bifenture EC, 80 oz of Bifenture 10DF, or 72 oz of Brigade WSB. Multiple applications may be made per season, at a minimum re-treatment interval of 30 days. The REI is 12 hours and the PHI is 14 days. This insecticide is extremely toxic to fish, aquatic invertebrates and bees, and all precautions to avoid these exposures must be observed. Specifically, to help minimize exposure to pollinators, the following statement about the application timing must be observed, “Do not apply this product until after petal fall”. Since bifenthrin is considered one of the strongest insecticides against brown marmorated stink bug but can be disruptive to natural enemies of secondary pests, we recommend its use later in the season for apples, when stink bug populations are highest. In peaches and nectarines, its benefits might be best as fruit approach maturity, but outside of the 14-day PHI. This Emergency Exemption expires on October 15, 2016.

Plum curculio movement into orchards

Greetings, For the last couple of years we have experienced the kind of weather patterns during the apple bloom and post-bloom periods that are conducive to protracted movement of plum curculio into orchards from their overwintering habitat in adjacent woodlands. While many plum curculio may move into orchards more synchronously in years when conditions are warm and dry during the bloom, therefore resulting in good control when effective products are applied at petal fall, in a year like 2016, this pest may need to be targeted with additional sprays after petal fall, especially in orchards where pressure has been high in recent years. The warming pattern forecasted for next week may well result in increased curculio movement. In the northern regions of Virginia, next week will also bring the critical 250DD post-biofix timing for codling moth and in the central and southern regions, codling moth degree days will approach the 550 mark, at which the second half of first brood codling moth is targeted. Consequently, if both species require management at this time, the insecticides that are considered effective against both include, in alphabetical order, Assail, Calypso, Imidan and Imidan + Lannate.  In our Spray Bulletin for Commercial Tree Fruit Growers, we rate Avaunt quite strongly against plum curculio but somewhat less so for codling moth. Other products, such as many of the pyrethroids, are also rated well against both, as are some of the combination products that contain a pyrethroid and another active ingredient, such as Voliam Xpress or Endigo, although as always, we caution against using these broad-spectrum materials too early and/or too often in the post-bloom period, since secondary pest issues may result.

White peach scale seasonal biology and management

Greetings,  Research in the early 1970’s by Virginia Tech entomologist, Marvin Bobb, showed that white peach scale populations in the Charlottesville area produced first generation crawlers that were present during May. Second generation crawlers were found through July and those of the third generation were present from late August through September. The cool and wet conditions that have prevailed for much of April have likely slowed the rate of white peach scale egg hatch and nymphal development this year, so stone fruit orchards with a history of this pest can be treated for first generation crawlers now. Recommended materials for managing this pest include, in alphabetical order, Centaur, Diazinon, Esteem, Lannate, and Movento.

Brown marmorated stink bug survey for home and business owners

Greetings,  The Northeastern IPM Center and the BMSB IPM Working Group have created a survey to assess the issue with brown marmorated stink bug invasion of homes and businesses in the fall and winter and how folks have responded to it.  Regardless of whether or to what extend you have experienced this issue in past years, your feedback would be very helpful and most appreciated. The survey can be found at BMSB homeowner/business owner survey

 

Dinotefuran Section 18 approved for Virginia

On July 16, 2015  the EPA approved a Section 18 Emergency Exemption for use of the insecticide, dinotefuran, against brown marmorated stink bug in pome and stone fruit crops in Virginia. The two products included in this exemption are Venom Insecticide and Scorpion 35SL Insecticide. Per application, Venom can be used at rates between 4.0 and 6.75 oz of product (0.179 to 0.302 lb active ingredient) per acre and Scorpion at 8.0 to 12.0 fl oz of product (0.203 to 0.304 lb active ingredient) per acre. Restrictions include a maximum of two applications, a seasonal maximum of 0.608 lb active ingredient per acre (regardless of product used), and a minimum 7-day application interval. The restricted entry interval for both products is 12-hours and a 3-day pre-harvest interval must be observed for both. This compound is highly toxic to bees. This Section 18 for use of dinotefuran  in Virginia pome and stone fruit expires on October 15, 2015.

Section 18 Emergency Exemption for Bifenture EC, Bifenture 10DF, and Brigade WSB

On April 6, 2015, the Environmental Protection Agency approved a Section 18 Emergency Exemption for use of the bifenthrin-based products, Brigade WSB, Bifenture EC, and Bifenture 10DF against brown marmorated stink bug in apples, peaches, and nectarines in Virginia. Please note that this exemption applies only to the products mentioned above. Applications must be made only during the post-bloom period and by ground only, at a rate of 0.08 to 0.2 lb active ingredient (a.i.) per acre, with not more than 0.5 lb a.i. per acre per season. These application rates equate to 5.12 – 12.8 fl oz of Bifenture EC, 12.8 – 32.0 oz of Bifenture 10DF, and 12.8 – 32.0 oz of Brigade WSB per acre, and seasonal maximums of 32 fl oz of Bifenture EC, 80 oz of Bifenture 10DF, or 72 oz of Brigade WSB. Multiple applications may be made per season, at a minimum interval of 30 days. The REI is 12 hours and the PHI is 14 days. This insecticide is extremely toxic to fish, aquatic invertebrates and bees, and all precautions to avoid these exposures must be observed. Specifically, to help minimize exposure to pollinators, the following statement about the application timing must be observed, “Do not apply this product until after petal fall”. Since bifenthrin is considered one of the strongest insecticides against brown marmorated stink bug but can be disruptive to natural enemies of secondary pests, we recommend its use later in the season for apples, when stink bug populations are highest. In peaches and nectarines, its benefits might be best as fruit approach maturity, but outside of the 14 day PHI. This Emergency Exemption expires on October 15, 2015.

Bifenthrin Section 18 approved for apple, peach and nectarine in Virginia

Greetings,  On June 20 the Environmental Protection Agency approved a Section 18 Emergency Exemption for use of the bifenthrin-based products, Brigade WSB, Bifenture EC, and Bifenture 10DF against brown marmorated stink bug in apples, peaches, and nectarines in Virginia. Please note that this exemption applies only to the products mentioned above. Applications must be made by ground only, at a rate of 0.08 to 0.2 lb active ingredient (a.i.) per acre, with not more than 0.5 lb a.I. per acre per season. These rates equate to 5.12 – 12.8 fl oz of Bifenture EC, 12.8 – 32.0 oz of Bifenture 10DF, and 12.8 – 32.0 oz of Brigade WSB per acre. Do not apply more than 32 fl oz of Bifenture EC, 80 oz of Bifenture 10DF, or 72 oz of Brigade WSB per acre per season. Multiple applications may be made per season, at a minimum interval of 30 days. The REI is 12 hours and the PHI is 14 days. This insecticide is extremely toxic to fish, aquatic invertebrates and bees, and all precautions to avoid these exposures must be observed. This Emergency Exemption expires on October 15, 2014.

Take the BMSB survey and receive a free guide to stink bug identification

Greetings,  As one component of the multi-state BMSB award from USDA, the Northeastern IPM Center has developed a short survey about your experiences with and response to BMSB. This is intended to take the pulse of the specialty crop stakeholder community at this point in our collective efforts to combat BMSB. I have copied the message from the NEIPM Center below, with the link to the on-line survey. Your participation would be very helpful. Until next time, best wishes – Chris

Got stink bugs? We need your help! We’re surveying growers to assess the impact of BMSB on crops and gather information that will help us defeat this pest. Receive a free Guide to Stink Bugs* if you complete the 10-minute BMSB survey (https://cornell.qualtrics.com/SE/?SID=SV_5ssnjXLNhvp6v1H). Your participation will help us to help you Stop BMSB!  The survey will be available until June 30th.

Thank you from the Outreach Team for “StopBMSB,” a project focused on the biology, ecology, and management of the brown marmorated stink bug. For more info: StopBMSB.org

*see it at https://pubs.ext.vt.edu/444/444-356/444-356_pdf.pdf

Clarification on bifenthrin use in Virginia

Greetings, In my last post I attached Section 18 labels from 2012 for the bifenthrin-based products, Brigade, Bifenture 10DF, and Bifenture EC, since I wanted to notify you of the approval but had not received labels for 2013. Please note that although the 2012 labels show a use period starting July 20 in Virginia apple, peaches and nectarines, in 2013 these products can be used from June 7 through October 15.

Until next time, best wishes – Chris

Bifenthrin Section 18 for Virginia approved

Greetings, On June 10, I received notification from the Virginia Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services that EPA has approved the use of bifenthrin against brown marmorated stink bug in apple, peach, and nectarine orchards in Virginia.  Only the products Brigade WSB, Bifenture EC, and Bifenture 10DF are approved for use under this Section 18 Emergency Exemption, which is in force through October 15, 2013.  I do not yet have the updated Section 18 labels for these products, but since there were no changes to the use patterns approved in 2012, I have attached the Section 18 labels from last year.

Until next time, best wishes – Chris

2012-07-24 Brigade WSB BSMB Section 18 VA Final

Section 18 Bifenture BMSB-VA Final 7_23_2012