A step back in time

 

Extension’s popular annual bus tour series, which began in 1977, is the longest running program of its type in Virginia.

Extension’s popular annual bus tour series, which began in 1977, is the longest running program of its type in Virginia.

Feb 15, 2015 – In honor of Virginia Cooperative Extension’s centennial in 2014, we present this brief history of Extension forestry, as drawn from a 1980 publication titled “College of the Fields.” Read the complete history, which references a number of former college faculty members, at www.ext.vt.edu/about/extension-resources-history.pdf.

Virginia’s Extension forestry legacy began at the University of Virginia in 1919 with the appointment of Wilbur O’Bryne from Yale. O’Bryne taught and served from Charlottesville for at least six years before he became a forestry professor and Extension forester at Virginia Agricultural and Mechanical College, now known as Virginia Tech. His forest management work focused on timber harvesting and erosion control.

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4-H members’ visit with lawmakers in Richmond moved to Feb. 24

 Several hundred 4-H'ers gather on the steps of the Virginia State Capitol during the 2014 visit.


Several hundred 4-H’ers gather on the steps of the Virginia State Capitol during the 2014 visit.

BLACKSBURG, Va., Feb. 17, 2015 – Editor’s note: 4-H Day at the State Capitol has been rescheduled for Feb. 24. It was postponed Feb. 17 due to the winter weather that is affecting much of Virginia.

Hundreds of 4-H members to visit lawmakers Tuesday

BLACKSBURG, Va., Feb. 16, 2015 – More than 900 4-H members and volunteers will visit Richmond Tuesday to meet with their legislators and learn about Virginia’s legislative branch of government for the annual 4-H Day at the State Capitol.

Virginia 4-H has sponsored the annual trip to Richmond for more than 20 years. It’s a chance for students to learn about the legislative process and to express their gratitude to state delegates and senators who support the 4-H youth development programs.

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Virginia 4-H Livestock Judging Team wins national contest

Rockingham County 4-H Livestock Judging Team, front row, from left: Tammy Craun, coach; Hannah Craun; and Makalyn Nesselrodt. Back row, David Walker, coach; Bailey Carpenter; and Caley Ellington.

Rockingham County 4-H Livestock Judging Team, front row, from left: Tammy Craun, coach; Hannah Craun; and Makalyn Nesselrodt. Back row, David Walker, coach; Bailey Carpenter; and Caley Ellington.

BLACKSBURG, Va., Feb. 17, 2015 – The Rockingham County 4-H Livestock Judging Team took first high team overall among 25 other teams in the National Western Invitational Livestock Judging Contest in Denver, Colorado, last month.

The team placed second in sheep, fifth in swine, and third in beef.

The four-member team included:

  • Caley Ellington of Linville, Virginia;
  • Bailey Carpenter of Mt. Crawford, Virginia;
  • MaKalyn Nesselrodt of Harrisonburg, Virginia; and
  • Hannah Craun of Bridgewater, Virginia.

In the individual competition, Ellington placed third overall and Nesselrodt placed ninth overall.

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Agritourism can boost farmers’ revenue, Virginia Tech study finds

A recent Virginia Tech study found that agritourism, from pick-your-own apple orchards to pumpkin patches, can help boost profits.

A recent Virginia Tech study found that agritourism, from pick-your-own apple orchards to pumpkin patches, can help boost profits.

BLACKSBURG, Va., Feb. 11, 2015 – From pick-your-own strawberry operations and winery tasting rooms to pumpkin patch fields and cut-your-own Christmas tree farms, agritourism is growing in the commonwealth and across the country. A recent statewide study by Virginia Tech found that it’s not just a pleasant way to spend a Sunday — it’s also a viable way for farmers to supplement their income.

The commonwealth’s top two industries, agriculture and tourism, were evaluated using a survey-based study by a team from Virginia Tech’s College of Agriculture and Life Sciencesand Virginia Cooperative Extension.

In Virginia, both the number of midsize farms and the revenue of those farms have been declining. The study found that agritourism could be a viable option for farm managers to diversify and augment income.

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International experience inspires student to focus on household water quality issues in Virginia

Jacob Cantor (right) presents a poster to Virginia Tech President Timothy Sands (left), Provost Mark McNamee (center), and Erin Ling (background), coordinator of the Virginia Household Water Quality Program, illustrating the results of his outreach on the Eastern Shore.

Jacob Cantor (right) presents a poster to Virginia Tech President Timothy Sands (left), Provost Mark McNamee (center), and Erin Ling (background), coordinator of the Virginia Household Water Quality Program, illustrating the results of his outreach on the Eastern Shore.

BLACKSBURG, Va., Feb. 10, 2015 – Jacob Cantor’s path to educating residents on Virginia’s Eastern Shore about household water quality started in faraway Oaxaca, Mexico.

A senior from Fairfax, Virginia, majoring in biological systems engineering in the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Cantor became interested in how his academic training could benefit international development projects. So he volunteered south of the border at the Hunger Project working with clean cookstoves and water quality issues in a small village.

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