Tag Archives: impacts

Wellness Display at Portsmouth City Hall Creates Increased Health Awareness for National Nutrition Month

2018 National Nutrition Month Display in Portsmouth City Hall

VCE-City of Portsmouth’s National Nutrition Month Nutrition and Wellness Display in Portsmouth’s City Hall

In 2015, the Virginia County Health Rankings (Robert Wood Johnson Foundation), which measures the overall health of each county in all 50 states, ranked the City of Portsmouth at 118th for its health performance. The health ranking is one of the tools used to determine the need for educational and community-based health programs in an area.

In addition, the Healthy People 2020 Initiative (Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotions) now encourages the development of programs and partnerships that can make a difference in communities’ health outcomes. Employee wellness programs were especially noted for gains in disease prevention and injury and improvement in health and quality of life.

According to the Virginia Cooperative Extension’s Situation Analysis Survey, City of Portsmouth citizens reported that the most important issue regarding health and wellness is learning healthy eating habits and nutrition.

RESPONSE

Each year in March, Crystal Barber — the Family and Consumer Sciences Extension Agent and registered dietitian for the VCE–City of Portsmouth office — incorporates National Nutrition Month (NNM) campaign messages, along with research-based information provided by VCE to support individual and family health education needs.

The 2018 NNM event was held in the Portsmouth City Hall lobby, and 225 individuals visited the exhibit. To help promote the theme, “Go Further With Food,” free handouts on nutrition and wellness, upcoming programs, and incentives were provided. Assisting with this effort were Anthem Healthcare representative Lelani Lawrence and Portsmouth Public library staff member LuKendra Banks.

Healthy eating samples were set up to educate participants about making healthy food and drink choices. Cabot Cheese donated several varieties of portioned, sliced cheese, nutrition and wellness educational brochures, and recipes.

The Department of Parks and Recreation and Leisure Services Assistant Director Mark Palamarchuck helped with food storage and setup for cold items to ensure the safety of perishable healthy snacks. The Portsmouth Public Library provided a list of nutrition and wellness books by credible authors that addressed current nutrition trends. The Portsmouth Department of Marketing, Communications, and Tourism donated City of Portsmouth giveaways.

Master Food Volunteer Regina Jones and FCS Occasional Volunteer Regina Hines also assisted with the event.

RESULTS

Comments were submitted by 52 of the 225 participants:

  • 98 percent of participants stated that the display was very informative and well-organized;
  • 95 percent of participants stated that the program increased their knowledge about nutrition, wellness, and other VCE programs.

Comments received:

  • “Love the way the information was provided across the life span.”
  • “This event encourages people to keep a healthy lifestyle.”
  • “The free handouts on the tables were very informative. Some info I can share with my family.”
  • “The event has been beneficial for me. Every year, I learn something from the interaction and the handouts, and enjoy the healthy snacks. There have been some that I actually purchased while shopping for groceries, for example, hummus.”
  • “Love the setup. Really looking forward to speaking to the dietitian in-depth.”
  • “The presenters were knowledgeable and friendly, and I loved the healthy snacks and Portsmouth incentives.”
  • “This event has given me new motivation, and I plan to enroll in the VCE Diabetes Prevention Program.”
  • “Please continue to be seen at City Hall on a regular basis as a reminder to us that ‘We Are What We Eat.'”
  • “It was great to get so much valuable information on nutrition and wellness. I also got lots of info on the Master Gardeners.”
  • “This was a great opportunity for the employees of Portsmouth to learn about nutrition. The display is very informative, and the programs are wonderful.”

FOLLOW-UP

Mark Palamarchuck suggested that the Department of Parks and Recreation become more involved in the event. It was determined that a National Nutrition Month Wellness Display Planning Committee should be established for next year’s event. Current and new partners, including city employees and residents, are invited to become a part of this impactful effort geared towards improving the health of our city.

Please contact Crystal Barber at 757-393-5125 if you are interested in serving on this committee.

Share

Prince William County residents learn about living healthy with diabetes

Diabetes is the sixth leading cause of death in Virginia. In Prince William County, an estimated 50,000 people are living with the incurable and expensive disease.

Diabetes can be hard to manage for the afflicted and their families, but Virginia Cooperative Extension created a class to help diabetes patients in Prince William County lead healthier, easier lives.

Thirty-four people, including those living with diabetes and a few supportive family members, enrolled in the “Living Well with Diabetes” class in recent years. Throughout four sessions and a follow-up session, the enrollees learned about helpful lifestyle changes through nutrition, physical activity, medication compliance, and stress management.

“It was enjoyable while still learning about taking care of yourself without being judged,” said one attendee.

Continue reading>>

Share

Norfolk fifth graders ‘light up’ during review on electricity

norfolk-costanzaIn Norfolk elementary schools, students take SOLs on electricity concepts a year after they’ve been taught them. But the Virginia 4-H In-School Electricity Curriculum, supported by Virginia Cooperative Extension, seeks to provide a hands-on refresher before the SOLs — much to the delight of students and teachers alike.

By the end of the day-long session in one classroom, a student was using her necklace in place of a wire to light a circuit.

“This program accomplishes two main things: it brings out students’ creativity while engaging material they already know, and it relieves some pressure on teachers to cover material they may not be familiar with,” said Virginia Cooperative Extension agent and project lead Gregory Costanza.

Typically, students in Norfolk elementary schools are taught the SOL curriculum on electricity in late fall of the fourth-grade year, but take the test in fifth grade. Teachers and principals have expressed concerns with the gap, especially considering many fifth-grade teachers have not taught fourth grade and have little experience with the content.

Continue reading>>

 

Share

‘Proactive’ programming in Loudoun County tackles foodborne illness from the ground up

Each year in the U.S., there are approximately 48 million illnesses, 128,000 hospitalizations, and 3,000 deaths linked to foodborne illness. Twenty foodborne illness outbreaks were reported in 2013 in Virginia alone, with an average of 18 Virginia residents sickened per outbreak.

In Loudoun County, Virginia Cooperative Extension has spent the past two years delivering food safety education programming to locals. In 2015, this included a farmer’s market “Vendor Tuneup” workshop, a presentation on safe food preparation at a farmer’s market annual meeting, a pH testing workshop, two ServSafe Manager courses, on-site evaluations of farms and kitchen operations, and consulting.

In 2016, Extension added onto the program list with food safety and direct marketing workshops for growers, farmers market food safety workshops, ServSafe, a drinking water clinic, and more.

Two greenhouse operations in the area were trained on Good Agricultural Practices (GAP) certification and food safety practices, and have implemented changes as a result of this effort.

Continue reading>>

Share

Symposium addresses growing crisis of food insecurity in Richmond

In the City of Richmond, Virginia, 40,020 residents are food insecure and lack access to enough food for an active healthy lifestyle — roughly 20 percent of the total city population.

In July 2011, Richmond’s mayor established The Food Policy Task Force to “ensure all residents have access to healthy foods and an understanding of the impact this has on both an individual’s health and the health of the community at large.”

Virginia Cooperative Extension agents served on the task force and found that 20 to 60 percent of Richmond’s population – or between 40,000 to more than 120,000 of total residents – are going hungry or are at risk of food insecurity due to lack of healthy food access or consumption.

In 2014, the Richmond Extension office hosted the Urban Food Desert Symposium at Fifth Street Baptist Church, a church located in one of the 25 food deserts across the City. The First Lady of Virginia, Dorothy McAuliffe, gave opening remarks.

Continue reading>>

Share