Tag Archives: healthy treats

Summer Treats to Cool Off and Eat Smart

When the weather heats up, it’s time to start reaching in the freezer for a cool summer treat. And I don’t mean for those plastic tubes of frozen colored sugar water. The Family Nutrition Program has plenty of tasty recipes for healthier popsicles and smoothies that your whole family will love.

When you make your own summer treats, you get to control the ingredients and can make healthier choices. These frozen goodies get their sweetness from fruit and yogurt, which provide vitamins and minerals that added sugar doesn’t. Most of these recipes are also made with low-fat dairy foods, which are good for bone health. For adventurous eaters, some of these recipes also have super-good-for-you dark leafy greens. Leafy greens are also great for bone health and can be lacking in many peoples’ diets.

Are you ready to break out the blender?

You can also get creative and come up with your own favorite smoothie flavor combinations. Get inspired with this Basic Smoothie Recipe.

I’ve seen a lot of fun homemade popsicles online, too. The following Basic Popsicle Recipe is a fun way to get your kids excited about cooking. Help them combine their favorite fruits, juices, or dairy products. They’ll love taste testing their different creations. Make things more interesting by layering different flavors for rainbow colored popsicles. The hardest part of making popsicles at home is waiting until they’re frozen to eat them!

generic recipe for making popsicles and frozen pops

It’s easy to mix and match ingredients using the Basic Popsicle Recipe.

Note- If your family likes popsicles, it may be worth buying popsicle molds. It’s easier to remove the popsicles and they’re reusable. But you can also use paper cups with wooden sticks or plastic spoons or ice cube trays and toothpicks.

Does your family enjoy frozen treats in the summer? What are your favorite flavors?

Happy and Healthy Halloween!

Halloween is such a fun time of year, for kids and adults alike. The creative costumes, the spooky decorations, and of course the bags full of candy make Halloween a very popular holiday. But that last one, the bags full of sugary candy, also makes Halloween the start of a tricky time of year to Eat Smart that spans all the way through the New Year.

I was SHOCKED when I read this!  (Found here.)

I was SHOCKED when I read this! No one needs that much candy.
(Found here.)

Fortunately, there are some new trends that will help families keep the fun and avoid the dietary disaster.

Healthy Tricks- Candy Swaps

There are different ways to get your kids on board, like the Switch Witch or Candy Buy Backs, but the basic idea is to go trick or treating as usual, enjoy a little bit of the candy and get rid of the rest. Because we all know that if it’s in the house, it’s going to get eaten and nobody needs mounds of candy sitting around tempting them. Offer a special gift, like a trip to a local playground for the afternoon, or a 15-minute bedtime extension “coupon,” in exchange for giving away the candy. Get creative with non-food rewards- you know best what will get your child excited.

Bonus Tip- You don’t have to give away candy to trick-or-treaters who visit you. Check out this list of fun alternatives that kids (and their parents!) will love just as much.

Healthy Treats

There are tons of ideas out there. These are a few of my favorites.

Fruit-based version of the classic candy corn. Found on Super Healthy Kids.

Fruit-based version of the classic candy corn. Found on Super Healthy Kids.

 

DIY Clementine Jack o Lanterns. Found on Mind Body Green.

DIY Clementine Jack o Lanterns. Found on Mind Body Green.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Banana Ghosts and Tangerine Pumpkins. Found on Weelicious.

Banana Ghosts and Tangerine Pumpkins. Found on Weelicious.

Jack o Lantern Sweet Potato Fries. Found on Tablespoon.

Jack o Lantern Sweet Potato Fries. Found on Tablespoon.

 

 

 

 

 

 

(Even more ideas from Clemson Cooperative Extension.)

How do you handle Eating Smart on Halloween in your house?