Tag Archives: horticulture

Virginia Cooperative Extension offers tips on pest management at greenhouse and nursery workshop

Virginia Cooperative Extension will host a pest management workshop on updated techniques for controlling diseases and insects in greenhouse and nursery environments on Jan. 26, 2017.

The workshop will take place at Battlefield Farms Inc. located at 23190 Clarks Mountain Road in Rapidan, Virginia from 8 a.m. – 5 p.m.

Faculty from Virginia Cooperative Extension, the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, and the University of Maryland Extension will lead the workshops.

Other topics to be covered during the event are conventional and biological control options available to growers, plant growth regulator basics with an emphasis on perennials, and nutrient and water efficiency on nursery crops.

For more information, to register, and to request special accommodation contact Shawn Appling at 540-727-3435 or ashawn6@vt.edu.

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Virginia Cooperative Extension boosts county business by connecting communities

When a local landscape business owner was looking to train someone to work and assist in her business, she tapped into Virginia Cooperative Extension’s expertise for help.

Franklin County Family and Consumer Sciences Extension Agent Carol Haynes helped a local high school student find a job — which helped the student as well as a local business.

Franklin County Family and Consumer Sciences Extension Agent Carol Haynes helped a local high school student find a job — which helped the student as well as a local business.

Family and Consumer Sciences Extension Agent Carol Haynes in Franklin County knew exactly where to turn to accommodate the request. Haynes drew on Extension’s close relationship with the school system and contacted Diana Cannaday, the FFA and horticulture teacher in the county.

Cannaday recommended one of her students who was looking for an opportunity to learn and grow. She facilitated the connection between the student and the business owner.

“This had a very real impact for the business owner and my student’s employment,” said Haynes. “Virginia Cooperative extension has a good working relationship with Franklin County high school students and teachers. This was a great opportunity to foster our relationship with the county school system and provided added value to a thriving horticulture program within the school system.”

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High tunnel grown blueberry produces fruits sooner and better quality

Suziblue' blueberries grown in a high tunnel at Randolph Farm. Photo taken May 10, 2016.

Suziblue’ blueberries grown in a high tunnel at Randolph Farm. Photo taken May 10, 2016.

Growing blueberries, in an unheated greenhouse called a high tunnel, may be a good alternative for Virginia growers. Some early blueberry varieties with low chill requirements can take advantage of the high tunnel conditions and produce high quality berries very early in the season when demand for locally grown berries is high. In a high tunnel at Virginia State University’s Randolph Farm, several southern highbush varieties are producing higher quality fruit that are two to three weeks earlier than the same varieties grown in the field.

If you need additional information about growing blueberry in the field or in the high tunnel, contact:

Reza Rafie, arafie@vsu.edu, 804-712-4600
Chris Mullins, cmullins@vsu.edu, 804-543-2559

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