Tag Archives: outreach

Danville juvenile detainees sow a better future with newfound horticulture skills

At the W. W. Moore Juvenile Detention facility in Danville, detained youths are being offered the chance at a green thumb, sponsored by Virginia Cooperative Extension. It’s an opportunity that, for some, can change the course of their future.

Jane Clardy, a former teacher and founder of the facility’s 10-week horticulture program, ran into a former detainee and student, who landed a recurring construction job but had hopes of a future in landscaping.

“He told me he always shows his horticulture certificate when he applies and is interviewed,” Clardy said of the encounter. “He told me his goal is to one day be his own boss and have a landscaping company. I smiled for two straight hours after seeing him.”

The program focuses on basic knowledge related to how plants grow, effective plant care strategies, and the importance of proper plant management practices. Holding these basic skills helps make the youth more attractive to an employer in plant nurseries, lawn care companies, and various grounds maintenance careers.

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Outreach programs bring awareness of importance of local growers to Scott County

A 2013 study in Scott County showed a lack of awareness and support of local growers throughout the county. In response, the Virginia Cooperative Extension planned two outreach programs, with support from the Extension Leadership Council, Master Gardeners, and Natural Tunnel State Park to help demonstrate the importance of agriculture for growers and consumers alike.

The first program was an heirloom seed swap. The event showcased two educational programs on seed saving and growing vegetables in home gardens and highlighted Seed Savers Exchange, Community Supported Agriculture opportunities, and support industries.

The second program was the Clinch River Food Festival, which highlighted local agricultural foods and products, such as the heirloom tomato. At the end of the festival, attendees were treated to a dinner highlighting local foods such as butternut squash, goat cheese, lamb, poultry, tomatoes, shiitake mushrooms, sorghum, honey, and berries.

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New workforce opportunities for students

Agriculture is an evolving industry that is becoming more scientific and technical. These changes mean exciting new career opportunities, but students must be equipped with the skills and knowledge to meet employers’ ever-changing needs.

Holston High School students played an important role in finishing the inside of the barn that was built using the grant funds. Once the structure was up, they constructed walls and sides to keep the animals safe.

Holston High School students played an important role in finishing the inside of the barn that was built using the grant funds. Once the structure was up, they constructed walls and sides to keep the animals safe.

In an effort to help teachers prepare students for these jobs, Virginia Tech has provided six Virginia high school programs with Virginia Agricultural Education Centers of Innovation grants. This funding is made possible through the Virginia Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services with matching funds from the Virginia Tech Foundation Fund for Community Viability.

“We are excited to work with agriculture teachers who are pushing traditional boundaries to broaden students’ education and career opportunities,” said Donna Westfall-Rudd, associate professor of agricultural, leadership, and community education and project leader for Virginia Agricultural Education Centers of Innovation.

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Virginia Cooperative Extension boosts county business by connecting communities

When a local landscape business owner was looking to train someone to work and assist in her business, she tapped into Virginia Cooperative Extension’s expertise for help.

Franklin County Family and Consumer Sciences Extension Agent Carol Haynes helped a local high school student find a job — which helped the student as well as a local business.

Franklin County Family and Consumer Sciences Extension Agent Carol Haynes helped a local high school student find a job — which helped the student as well as a local business.

Family and Consumer Sciences Extension Agent Carol Haynes in Franklin County knew exactly where to turn to accommodate the request. Haynes drew on Extension’s close relationship with the school system and contacted Diana Cannaday, the FFA and horticulture teacher in the county.

Cannaday recommended one of her students who was looking for an opportunity to learn and grow. She facilitated the connection between the student and the business owner.

“This had a very real impact for the business owner and my student’s employment,” said Haynes. “Virginia Cooperative extension has a good working relationship with Franklin County high school students and teachers. This was a great opportunity to foster our relationship with the county school system and provided added value to a thriving horticulture program within the school system.”

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Virginia Cooperative Extension works to increase colorectal cancer screening rates

Eighty by 2018 emblemColorectal cancer screening has proven to save lives.  Virginia Cooperative Extension has made the pledge to help increase colorectal cancer screening rates by supporting “80% by 2018″ — an initiative to reduce colorectal cancer as a major public health problem. The program is being led by the American Cancer Society, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the National Colorectal Cancer Roundtable (an organization co-founded by the ACS and CDC).

Colorectal cancer is the nation’s second-leading cause of cancer-related deaths; however, it is one of only a few cancers that can be prevented. Through proper colorectal cancer screening, doctors can find and remove hidden growths called “polyps” in the colon before they become cancerous. Removing polyps can prevent cancer altogether.

More than 750 organizations have committed to 80 percent by 2018, and they are working toward the shared goal of 80 percent of adults aged 50 and older being screened regularly for colorectal cancer by 2018.

“Colorectal cancer is a major public health problem,” said Carlin Rafie, assistant professor of human nutrition, foods, and exercise in the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences and Virginia Cooperative Extension adult nutrition specialist.  “Adults age 50 and older should be regularly screened for it. Despite this, we have found that many people aren’t getting tested because they don’t believe they are at risk, don’t understand that there are testing options, or don’t think they can afford it.”

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