EPA review of pyrethroids

The EPA is in the process of reviewing some of our older, broad-spectrum classes of insecticides. The comment period is now open for the preliminary ecological risk assessment of pyrethroids. I strongly support the need for continued availability of these materials because they are relatively safe for mammals and biodegradable. Importantly, pyrethroids are the only option for pest control of certain insect pests in some cropping systems. Entomologists, including myself, at universities throughout the Southeast have expressed their support for pyrethroids in a letter to the EPA. However, the EPA is really looking to hear from people that use these products responsibly. The below link provides a tool to make comments on EPA dockets without looking up each product individually. It also includes the type of information that is most helpful and a template to follow if so desired. Comments from our Virginia growers will be much appreciated!

https://www.votervoice.net/PWG/campaigns/48706/respond

Reminder for the 2017 Mid-Atlantic Strawberry Programs in Virginia Beach

The following is being issued on behalf of Roy Flanagan, Virginia Cooperative Extension ANR Agent, Virginia Beach (meeting information and registration forms can be found on my January 30, 2017 blog). This is a reminder for folks to register if you plan to attend any of the 2017 Mid-Atlantic Strawberry Programs in Virginia Beach. The room block with Fairfield Inns and Suites filled up quickly, we have increased that group of blocked rooms at the special rate of $86 per night.  If you tried to register and had issues, please email Roy Flanagan directly and he will get you in touch with the right person to get your room issues taken care of and get the reduced rate.

If you have questions, please contact Roy Flanagan.

Agriculture Extension Agent/ Virginia Beach

Office: 757-385-GROW (4769)

Email: RFlanaga@vbgov.com

Information on the pesticides under European Union scrutiny

The European Union (EU) is reviewing the current maximum residue levels (MRLs) for pesticides, some being used in peanut production. The process started in 2016 and will continue in 2017. As expected, peanut imports in EU may be affected by these changes. I am providing here information on these products (credit David Jordan and American Peanut Council), and I will continue to do so when I have new information. Although under review, please note that not all pesticides may have their MRLs lowered. peanut-notes-2017-no-12-comments-on-pesticides-eu-peanut-imports peanut-notes-2017-no-11-wto-communication-on-pesticides-and-mrls

peanut-notes-2017-no-11-wto-communication-on-pesticides-and-mrls

 

Peanut Variety and Quality Evaluation 2016 Report

Growers in Virginia, North Carolina, and South Carolina are always in need for high yielding, disease resistant and early maturing peanut varieties with good grading and processing quality. The multi-state Peanut Variety and Quality Evaluation (PVQE) program evaluates advanced breeding lines from the North Carolina State University and University of Florida breeding programs that can further be released as Virginia-type cultivars suitable for the region. These lines are compared with the current commercial cultivars, ‘Bailey’, ‘Sugg’, ‘Sullivan’, ‘Wynne’, and ‘Emery’ for yield and quality throughout the production region in Virginia, North Carolina and South Carolina. The 2016 report with the agronomic and grade PVQE data is available here :http: //pubs.ext.vt.edu/AREC/AREC-198/AREC-198.html. A summary of the 2014-2016 agronomic and grade performance is presented in the table below. In average of 3 years and five locations each year, ‘Bailey’ produced 4,477 pounds per acre and the crop value was 776 dollars per acre. Some of the new lines, however, significantly exceeded ‘Bailey’ for both pod yield and crop value; lines N11028ol and N12008CLSmT in particular. Unlike ‘Bailey’, which has normal oil chemistry, all the breeding lines tested recently in the PVQE program are high oleic. This means they have over 75% of their oil content made of oleic fatty acid; and this characteristic extends the freshness and shelf life of the peanuts from 4 to 32 weeks.

Summary of peanut 2014-2016 results

Summary of peanut 2014-2016 results

ESCC

View the Program: Virginia Eastern Shore Ag Conference and Trade Show

We look forward to seeing you January 25th and 26th at the 27th Annual Eastern Shore Ag conference & Trade Show! You can find the program online at: https://onedrive.live.com/?authkey=%21AEczhxLIHkUCwmY&cid=05F6B732110DB231&id=5F6B732110DB231%2129963&parId=5F6B732110DB231%21813&o=OneUp. Virginia pesticide re-certification and Certified Crop Adviser credits will be available. See the program for more information.

The event will be held at the Eastern Shore Community College Workforce Development Center, 29300 Lankford Highway, Melfa, VA 23410. When you enter the driveway to the Community College, we will be meeting in the building to the left.

The Annual Oyster Roast will be held on Wednesday night, January 25th beginning with a social at 6:00 pm and oysters served at 6:30 pm. Along with oysters, there will be all-you-can-eat barbecue, sides and beverages. Tickets will be $35.00 in advance and $40.00 if purchased the day of the oyster roast.

If you have any questions or concerns please contact either Theresa Pittman (tpittman@vt.edu) or Ursula Deitch (ursula@vt.edu) for accommodation. Thank you!

Virginia Cooperative Extension logo

Virginia Eastern Shore Ag Conference and Trade Show

Join us in Melfa, VA for the 27th Annual Eastern Shore Agricultural Conference and Trade Show on January 25-26, 2017. This event is free, open to the public, and will be held at the Eastern Shore Community College Workforce Development Center. We will offer Virginia Pesticide Recertification credits for categories 1A, 10, 60, and 90. We will also offer Certified Crop Adviser Credits for nutrient management (2), soil and water (1), integrated pest management (4.5), crop management (6), and professional development (0.5). Click on the following link for topic areas being presented: ag-conf-press-release-2017

Wild Mustard and Wild Radish

This fall I have noticed quite a few fields plagued by wild mustard/wild radish.  These species are difficult to control primarily due to size at burndown time.  Some of the fields I have passed are already knee high and I would suspect very difficult to control now, let alone next spring.  The 7 day weather outlook is showing a warming trend with temperatures peaking near 70 degrees on Saturday.  This would be a good time to get ahead of wild mustard/wild radish.  My first suggestion for cleaning up these field would be Roundup plus 2,4-D.  Although the risk of injuring neighboring plants is less this time of year, it is not absent.  If you do decide to treat with this combination, please pay attention to what susceptible plants may be around.  Below is an article that goes more in depth about management of wild mustard/wild radish I authored for the 2017 Mid-Atlantic Field Crop Weed Management Guide and Virginia Pest Management Guide.  Excerpts similar to this one covering additional weed species can be found in both of the aforementioned publications.  Feel free to contact me with any questions or concerns.

problem-weed-mustard-and-radish

Dicamba Registered for Cotton and Soybean

Last week Monsanto received EPA registration for XtendiMax with Vapor Grip Technology for use on XtendFlex cotton and Roundup Ready 2 Xtend soybean.  Attached is an article authored by Dr. Alan York at NC State pertaining specifically to cotton.  I share Dr. York’s sentiments concerning this technology and will echo these same points at winter meetings.

york-dicamba-article